Real Estate

Report says housing 'out of reach' for Bay Area minimum wage workers

It's up to residents to decide 'what do we want for our communities?' advocate says

A person who wants to live in a two-bedroom, market rate apartment in the San Francisco metropolitan area must make more than $60 an hour to afford it, according to a report released last week by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

Stock image. (Special to Bay City News/smolaw)

The San Francisco metro area, comprised of San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin counties, has the most expensive housing of any other jurisdiction in the nation, according to the report. Residents of the area must earn $61.50 per hour to afford an apartment of that size.

The National Low Income Housing Coalition's 2022 Out of Reach report highlights the affordability crisis in the Bay Area and nationwide.

It says full-time minimum wage workers are unable to afford a modest two-bedroom rental home in any state, metropolitan area, or county. In 91% of U.S. counties, a one-bedroom rental home at fair market rent is also out of reach for a full-time minimum-wage worker.

"The task of solving America's affordable housing crisis might seem overwhelming, especially to those closest to the problem, but the solution is simple: we must invest in housing America," said Rep. Maxine Waters, chairwomen of the House Financial Services Committee in the preface to the report.

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The Bay Area is home to three of the top ten most expensive metropolitan areas in the country.

The other two are Santa Cruz-Watsonville and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara where it takes $60.35 and $55.15 to afford that two-bedroom rental home, the report says.

Catherine Bracy, CEO and co-founder of California-based TechEquity Collaborative, which mobilizes technology workers and companies to solve the affordability crisis, thinks the solution, especially in the Bay Area, boils down to a simple economic challenge.

She said we have more demand for housing than we have supply, so we must build more housing.

"Obviously, that's not going to happen overnight," Bracy said.

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So, we must also prevent people from losing their homes, she said. Lawmakers need to strengthen tenant laws while allowing property owners to make a fair living, Bracy added.

California requires jurisdictions to build certain amounts of market rate, moderate rate, low-income and very-low-income housing.

But "right now they are targets," Bracy said. "There are many cities that want to drag their feet."

Also, she thinks the state needs more housing than what is required by the targets.

"It's a daunting task," she said.

She called it a multi-jurisdictional problem. Each jurisdiction has a key to unlock solutions, she said, including the federal and state governments.

She would feel much better if the federal government put as much attention on housing as it does gas prices.

Housing is "a critical human need," she said.

"We don't treat it that way," she said.

People are coping, Bracy said, by cutting costs on other goods, going into debt, living in unsafe conditions and long distances from work.

Bracy said the lack of housing is causing homelessness.

Alina Harway, spokesperson for the Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California, which advocates for affordable housing in the Bay Area, thinks residents need to press lawmakers to create the changes needed.

It's up to residents to decide "what do we want for our communities?" Harway said.

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Report says housing 'out of reach' for Bay Area minimum wage workers

It's up to residents to decide 'what do we want for our communities?' advocate says

by Keith Burbank / Bay City News Service

Uploaded: Tue, Aug 9, 2022, 5:25 am

A person who wants to live in a two-bedroom, market rate apartment in the San Francisco metropolitan area must make more than $60 an hour to afford it, according to a report released last week by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

The San Francisco metro area, comprised of San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin counties, has the most expensive housing of any other jurisdiction in the nation, according to the report. Residents of the area must earn $61.50 per hour to afford an apartment of that size.

The National Low Income Housing Coalition's 2022 Out of Reach report highlights the affordability crisis in the Bay Area and nationwide.

It says full-time minimum wage workers are unable to afford a modest two-bedroom rental home in any state, metropolitan area, or county. In 91% of U.S. counties, a one-bedroom rental home at fair market rent is also out of reach for a full-time minimum-wage worker.

"The task of solving America's affordable housing crisis might seem overwhelming, especially to those closest to the problem, but the solution is simple: we must invest in housing America," said Rep. Maxine Waters, chairwomen of the House Financial Services Committee in the preface to the report.

The Bay Area is home to three of the top ten most expensive metropolitan areas in the country.

The other two are Santa Cruz-Watsonville and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara where it takes $60.35 and $55.15 to afford that two-bedroom rental home, the report says.

Catherine Bracy, CEO and co-founder of California-based TechEquity Collaborative, which mobilizes technology workers and companies to solve the affordability crisis, thinks the solution, especially in the Bay Area, boils down to a simple economic challenge.

She said we have more demand for housing than we have supply, so we must build more housing.

"Obviously, that's not going to happen overnight," Bracy said.

So, we must also prevent people from losing their homes, she said. Lawmakers need to strengthen tenant laws while allowing property owners to make a fair living, Bracy added.

California requires jurisdictions to build certain amounts of market rate, moderate rate, low-income and very-low-income housing.

But "right now they are targets," Bracy said. "There are many cities that want to drag their feet."

Also, she thinks the state needs more housing than what is required by the targets.

"It's a daunting task," she said.

She called it a multi-jurisdictional problem. Each jurisdiction has a key to unlock solutions, she said, including the federal and state governments.

She would feel much better if the federal government put as much attention on housing as it does gas prices.

Housing is "a critical human need," she said.

"We don't treat it that way," she said.

People are coping, Bracy said, by cutting costs on other goods, going into debt, living in unsafe conditions and long distances from work.

Bracy said the lack of housing is causing homelessness.

Alina Harway, spokesperson for the Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California, which advocates for affordable housing in the Bay Area, thinks residents need to press lawmakers to create the changes needed.

It's up to residents to decide "what do we want for our communities?" Harway said.

Comments

John B
Registered user
Foothill High School
on Aug 9, 2022 at 9:48 am
John B, Foothill High School
Registered user
on Aug 9, 2022 at 9:48 am

This is the problem we have across bay area. Cities do drag a lot of any new construction, with zoning laws, planning, this/that regulation drag for months/years etc. They pass regulations left and right as they do not affect current residents. No body cares. This is going to impact the future residents, middle and low income people. These people and young adults never show in the city meetings. Most of the council members are well to do and aged. They never going to understand the problems. Middle, low income and young adults, don't have any representation nor their interests taken into. So the cities do not care for...Need state laws with carrots and sticks so that this issue is addressed. Let the problem blow up little more, state will get into more draconian laws, taking away the local control and fess etc.


Get the Facts
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Aug 9, 2022 at 1:28 pm
Get the Facts, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Aug 9, 2022 at 1:28 pm

Being that the minimum wage hasn't gone up since 2008, this is not at all surprising. Minimum wage increases should be tied into cost of living increases.


Swagu
Registered user
Bridle Creek
on Aug 9, 2022 at 8:20 pm
Swagu, Bridle Creek
Registered user
on Aug 9, 2022 at 8:20 pm

My neighbor is Pleasanton is the original owner and bought his house in 1970 for $32k.
My grandma bought her home in eastside San Jose in 1951 for $13k.

Adjusted for inflation, $34,000 in 1970 is equal to $251,439 in 2022, and the home is worth 1.4 million.
Adjusted for inflation, $13,000 in 1951 is equal to $144,977 in 2022, and the home is worth just over 1 million.

The same logic boomers used for university: "I could pay for my college working my summer job stop complaining kids" is now applying to the house market.

Instead of a place to live, homes are being treated like investments in a game of monopoly. Investment banks and rich foreigners are buying up homes in cash pricing out working class families from being able to afford a basic home to buy.


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