News

Pleasanton City Council approves 10x Genomics expansion plans

Community benefits include $1 million for Fire Station No. 2 renovations

10x Genomics is expected to complete the first phase of building its new campus in Pleasanton by 2023. (Image courtesy of city of Pleasanton)

The site of the former Pleasanton Plaza retail complex will become the new home for one of Pleasanton's best-known companies in the next couple of years, after the City Council unanimously approved a redevelopment application from 10x Genomics on Tuesday.

Located just south of Stoneridge Shopping Center, the 14.6-acre site at 1701 Springdale Ave. is now poised to be made over into a new campus where the biotech company will conduct a variety of research, development and laboratory work. Three new buildings totaling 381,000 square feet and a multilevel parking garage will be constructed over three phases lasting several years.

With a number of community benefits anticipated from the project including increased sales and property tax revenue, transportation improvements and a $1 million contribution toward renovations for Fire Station No. 2, CEO and co-founder Serge Saxonov told the council that evening, "We see this relationship as a social pact with you to better the community's progress and improvement."

"We are very mission-driven. The people who work in the company are here to improve the world," Saxonov said. "We want to make things better, we want to create value, we want to make good stuff happen."

Mayor Karla Brown said she looks forward to bringing more high-paying jobs to Pleasanton with redevelopment of the site.

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"It's a priority for this council, our community and innovation technology to expand our life sciences industry. And this is a giant leap forward in doing that," Brown said, adding that "it was a pleasure to see the old buildings go down" at the project site "because they had reached a state of embarrassment."

Demolition and debris-clearing work was underway last month at the property new owned by 10x Genomics for its new corporate campus. (Photo by Jeremy Walsh)

Headquartered in Pleasanton for more than a decade, with facilities at both Stoneridge Corporate Plaza and Koll Center, 10x Genomics intends to consolidate and expand its existing operations, starting with Phase 1 of construction.

Set to open next year, the first building will have office space and clean rooms for labs, and be constructed in a contemporary style using a mix of materials and textures. A new plaza is also planned at the northeast end of the site, connecting the campus to Stoneridge Shopping Center, West Dublin-Pleasanton BART Station, and nearby office and residential developments.

The first phase will be designed to develop pedestrian connections to internal open spaces such as a central courtyard area for outdoor collaboration among employees, and buildings constructed during later phases of the project. Staff said much of the site will remain vacant and temporarily fenced off during Phase 1.

Conceptual designs including the color scheme and native landscaping for the project drew praise from city officials.

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"I find it an extremely attractive designed LED Gold building," Councilmember Jack Balch said before voting. "It comprises, Phase 2 and 3, an entire city block in our community with what I believe is gracious setbacks and abundant landscaping."

Pleasanton Chamber of Commerce CEO and president Steve Van Dorn concurred during the public hearing, saying, "Even though this was my third time seeing a presentation on this exciting project, I continue to be amazed at how positive an impact this will make to our community and our city."

"This is a dream project for any community and perfectly matches our city's economic development focus of expanding our life sciences business sector," Van Dorn said. "We believe they have crossed all the t's and dotted all the i's on this fantastic project."

Approximately 483 surface parking spaces -- equivalent to roughly 2 spaces per 1,000 square feet -- will be added for Building 1 during Phase 1 of construction, making use of a portion of the site's existing parking lot, which will be resurfaced and restriped. Upgraded lighting, landscaping and new sidewalk access will also be added. The entire buildout of Phase 1 is expected to reach completion by 2023.

During the later phases, "an additional 231,000 square feet of building area within one or two additional buildings generally along the east side of the subject site," along with a six-level parking structure with 1,172 parking spaces and 80 surface level parking spaces along the site's west side will be added, according to public documents. The city is also expected to receive another estimated $5 million from impact fees during Phases 2 and 3.

The building timeline for the later phases will be determined by the company's business needs at the time, but staff expects work to finish by 2030.

To recognize the company's long-term investment in the community, the city will rename the currently-named street Fabian Court, which connects the 10x Genomics building on Stoneridge Mall Road to the new campus on Springdale Avenue, later this year.

10x Genomics is expected to complete the first phase of building its new campus in Pleasanton by 2023. (Image courtesy of city of Pleasanton)

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Pleasanton City Council approves 10x Genomics expansion plans

Community benefits include $1 million for Fire Station No. 2 renovations

by / Pleasanton Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Jun 16, 2021, 6:20 pm

The site of the former Pleasanton Plaza retail complex will become the new home for one of Pleasanton's best-known companies in the next couple of years, after the City Council unanimously approved a redevelopment application from 10x Genomics on Tuesday.

Located just south of Stoneridge Shopping Center, the 14.6-acre site at 1701 Springdale Ave. is now poised to be made over into a new campus where the biotech company will conduct a variety of research, development and laboratory work. Three new buildings totaling 381,000 square feet and a multilevel parking garage will be constructed over three phases lasting several years.

With a number of community benefits anticipated from the project including increased sales and property tax revenue, transportation improvements and a $1 million contribution toward renovations for Fire Station No. 2, CEO and co-founder Serge Saxonov told the council that evening, "We see this relationship as a social pact with you to better the community's progress and improvement."

"We are very mission-driven. The people who work in the company are here to improve the world," Saxonov said. "We want to make things better, we want to create value, we want to make good stuff happen."

Mayor Karla Brown said she looks forward to bringing more high-paying jobs to Pleasanton with redevelopment of the site.

"It's a priority for this council, our community and innovation technology to expand our life sciences industry. And this is a giant leap forward in doing that," Brown said, adding that "it was a pleasure to see the old buildings go down" at the project site "because they had reached a state of embarrassment."

Headquartered in Pleasanton for more than a decade, with facilities at both Stoneridge Corporate Plaza and Koll Center, 10x Genomics intends to consolidate and expand its existing operations, starting with Phase 1 of construction.

Set to open next year, the first building will have office space and clean rooms for labs, and be constructed in a contemporary style using a mix of materials and textures. A new plaza is also planned at the northeast end of the site, connecting the campus to Stoneridge Shopping Center, West Dublin-Pleasanton BART Station, and nearby office and residential developments.

The first phase will be designed to develop pedestrian connections to internal open spaces such as a central courtyard area for outdoor collaboration among employees, and buildings constructed during later phases of the project. Staff said much of the site will remain vacant and temporarily fenced off during Phase 1.

Conceptual designs including the color scheme and native landscaping for the project drew praise from city officials.

"I find it an extremely attractive designed LED Gold building," Councilmember Jack Balch said before voting. "It comprises, Phase 2 and 3, an entire city block in our community with what I believe is gracious setbacks and abundant landscaping."

Pleasanton Chamber of Commerce CEO and president Steve Van Dorn concurred during the public hearing, saying, "Even though this was my third time seeing a presentation on this exciting project, I continue to be amazed at how positive an impact this will make to our community and our city."

"This is a dream project for any community and perfectly matches our city's economic development focus of expanding our life sciences business sector," Van Dorn said. "We believe they have crossed all the t's and dotted all the i's on this fantastic project."

Approximately 483 surface parking spaces -- equivalent to roughly 2 spaces per 1,000 square feet -- will be added for Building 1 during Phase 1 of construction, making use of a portion of the site's existing parking lot, which will be resurfaced and restriped. Upgraded lighting, landscaping and new sidewalk access will also be added. The entire buildout of Phase 1 is expected to reach completion by 2023.

During the later phases, "an additional 231,000 square feet of building area within one or two additional buildings generally along the east side of the subject site," along with a six-level parking structure with 1,172 parking spaces and 80 surface level parking spaces along the site's west side will be added, according to public documents. The city is also expected to receive another estimated $5 million from impact fees during Phases 2 and 3.

The building timeline for the later phases will be determined by the company's business needs at the time, but staff expects work to finish by 2030.

To recognize the company's long-term investment in the community, the city will rename the currently-named street Fabian Court, which connects the 10x Genomics building on Stoneridge Mall Road to the new campus on Springdale Avenue, later this year.

Comments

Doug Miller
Registered user
Ironwood
on Jun 17, 2021 at 8:44 am
Doug Miller, Ironwood
Registered user
on Jun 17, 2021 at 8:44 am

Well done Pleasanton City Council!


Janet Chen
Registered user
California Reflections
on Jun 17, 2021 at 10:28 pm
Janet Chen, California Reflections
Registered user
on Jun 17, 2021 at 10:28 pm

City council votes unanimously when jobs are added but when it comes to adding dense housing, never because we will just bus the workers over from the Central Valley. Plus the neighborhood character and God forbid, the wrong kind and color of people moving in.

How about city council voting unanimously to add more housing? Nope.

California has tried local control enough. As much as we hate it, it is time to strip away that control and move zoning decisions to the center. Add jobs but with that should come housing in the same proportion in the vicinity of those jobs.

Where is that plan?

We need to build dense, bike friendly, public-transit rich and environmentally sustainable communities. Suburban sprawl which will be the outcome here when jobs are added but no housing is not going to cut it anymore.


Pleasanton Parent
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 18, 2021 at 8:14 am
Pleasanton Parent, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 8:14 am

Good job getting this done.

Janet your comments are divisive and insinuating. You’re better than that.

There is nothing wrong with a community not wanting to have rack and stack housing and preserving a community feel.

We do need to help with affordability, completely agree, but look at this latest pandemic - spread fastest in dense housing areas, look at state infrastructure - water, roadways, schools all must be built before people arrive. And let’s not forget just quality of life - packing people on top of one another doesn’t build relationships it just further amplifies bad ones.

Calling for sustainable growth with affordable options for those coming are what we should be doing. Not calling for large complexes and calling your community racists. Be better.


Janet Chen
Registered user
California Reflections
on Jun 18, 2021 at 12:26 pm
Janet Chen, California Reflections
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 12:26 pm

To the Pleasanton Parent or any Parent for that matter...

Nothing divisive at all. Just plain old NIMBYism. What you are implying is that only homes that are single family homes are homes. Apartments, condominiums and townhouses are not homes and don't form communities. Plus they might invite the 'wrong' kind of people. That I think borders on racism but we get that.

On density and Covid, have you heard of San Francisco and their Covid rates? And have you heard of Googling some of that stuff or you are just thinking out loud based on what you feel? It is a myth perpetuated by the selfish NIMBYs hell bent on destroying our planet by sprawling out in car-dependent suburbia.

40,000 Americans die every year in road accidents and millions more are permanently disabled because of our infatuation with sprawl and driving everywhere besides all the negative externalities around health etc. You should be more concerned about that as a PARENT. I literally dread the day my son has to drive because we have designed our cities in a way that we are forced to drive.

You talk about schools? What teacher can afford to live and teach in these schools? Roadways is exactly what we should not be spending our tax dollars on. Instead, we should be living dense so that public transit pencils out. I assume you have heard of trains.

And infrastructure never comes up as a topic when adding jobs. They only show up when adding homes for families. And you need a lot more infrastructure for sprawl then denser communities. But no, facts don't matter. Only what I feel.

Unfortunately the planet is going to burn enough to stop with this NIMBYism but my family will suffer as well so that's that.

Until we change. And we the enlightened ones will change that for the better. Keep up with your NIMBYism.


Pleasanton Parent
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:02 pm
Pleasanton Parent, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:02 pm

"What you are implying is that only homes that are single family homes are homes. Apartments, condominiums and townhouses are not homes and don't form communities. Plus they might invite the 'wrong' kind of people. That I think borders on racism but we get that."

-Nope, never said that or implied it, you're projecting your narrative on my words. If you can't be open to alternative perspectives and solutions there is no point arguing this with you. Please be open minded to other people's interests, perspectives, experiences, and concerns. Happy to discuss real solutions to a real problem with open minded individuals.

"On density and Covid, have you heard of San Francisco and their Covid rates? And have you heard of Googling some of that stuff or you are just thinking out loud based on what you feel? It is a myth perpetuated by the selfish NIMBYs hell bent on destroying our planet by sprawling out in car-dependent suburbia."

-Are you really arguing that people dense populations didn't suffer an higher per capita rate of Covid than less dense areas? Don't believe me - straight from the CDC and CNN Web Link
Web Link

"40,000 Americans die every year in road accidents and millions more are permanently disabled because of our infatuation with sprawl and driving everywhere besides all the negative externalities around health etc. You should be more concerned about that as a PARENT. I literally dread the day my son has to drive because we have designed our cities in a way that we are forced to drive."

-606k US covid deaths, how many of those were in dense populations I can't find figures on, I bet more than 6%. I support public transit, remote work, variable lane bi-directional roadways, to cut down on the injury and environmental impacts of commuter traffic. Build and maintain the infrastructure. Don't let BART be a homeless shelter



Pleasanton Parent
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:13 pm
Pleasanton Parent, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:13 pm

"You talk about schools? What teacher can afford to live and teach in these schools? Roadways is exactly what we should not be spending our tax dollars on. Instead, we should be living dense so that public transit pencils out. I assume you have heard of trains."

-You're more than welcome to move to a dense area, no one is talking about taking those away as options from you.

"And infrastructure never comes up as a topic when adding jobs. They only show up when adding homes for families. And you need a lot more infrastructure for sprawl then denser communities. But no, facts don't matter. Only what I feel."

-Matt Sullivan disagrees with you. Infrastructure absolutely comes up with job creation - Costco, Ikea, Gilliag, etc. and those are easy ones. Infrastructure is people dependent, I may need more length of pipe with suburban households, but the total increase in volume of water consumed is the same - same with schools, roads (bike lanes), etc.

"Unfortunately the planet is going to burn enough to stop with this NIMBYism but my family will suffer as well so that's that. Until we change. And we the enlightened ones will change that for the better. Keep up with your NIMBYism."

-Until people are willing to be open minded to the community beyond their own similar thought solution cohort and understand there's more than "my way only" solutions to real problems we will continue to stall on progress towards solving these problems. I agree with problems you're articulating, but I don't agree with your single approach solution and community alienation, name calling, and shaming of any person that thinks differently.









Pleasanton Parent
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:24 pm
Pleasanton Parent, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:24 pm

.........and wait, you choose to live in a suburban neighborhood in Pleasanton, why are you advocating for high density housing when you're own personal choices don't support that decision making? There are plenty of condos and townhome communities in Pleasanton, Dublin, Livermore - some adjacent to public transit....yet you choose a single family homestead in California Reflections - a suburban neighborhood (arguably) as far away as possible from those things?


Janet Chen
Registered user
California Reflections
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:35 pm
Janet Chen, California Reflections
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 1:35 pm

To the Pleasanton Parent...

So educate us on this: Why does L.A. have so many COVID-19 cases? LA as in sprawling LA. Link below

Web Link

And you are going to use a once in a century pandemic to change how we live forever. And keep sprawling out and destroy our planet?

I assume you once in a while get to use up some of that equity you earn with your NIMBYism to travel to Europe and marvel at how they live in dense urban communities without an over-reliance on cars, don't you? If you have not, try it once. Oh and don't forget about Covid there and how they are somehow able to manage just fine. Or liberally use Singapore as an example.

And don't ever make callous statements about homelessness. You or anyone in your family are not that far away from that state so be kind. I don't want to live in a society where we look down on people down on their luck and neither should you.

And your solution to reducing road accidents is to build more roadways? Wow, one would assume you would not make these statements at least these days with the planet literally burning up. Try to leave your single family zoned enclave and explore out every once in a while.

This is what we should have everywhere in the richest country that has ever existed... "Over the Shinkansen's 50-plus-year history, carrying over 10 billion passengers, there has been not a single passenger fatality or injury on board due to train accidents." That's in Japan. That same is true in most of Europe.

But no. I got to have my pick-up truck to take me everywhere.

And remote work is not a panacea that you think it is. Google agglomeration effects and why it matters for productivity and innovation. Companies like Apple and other tech giants are not dumb to spend billions of dollars on their campuses so that a NIMBY can get to work remotely in sprawling car-dependent suburbia.


Michael Austin
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 18, 2021 at 4:49 pm
Michael Austin , Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 4:49 pm

More than Thirty-Five percent of all people killed in motor vehicle accidents in the Fifty US Sates were killed by people DUI.

April 24, 1951 - Japan Sakuragucho train fire killed 106 people, injured 92 people.

April 25, 2005 - Japanese commuter train left tracks crashed into apartment complex, killed 54 people injured 400 people.

May 14, 1991 - Shinga prefecture Kogen Rail Way and West Japan Railway crashed head on, killed 42 people injured 624.

March 1995 - Domestic terrorism Sarin incident, 14 people killed 5500 injured, 1000 people were temporarily blinded.

There is more, too numerous to list.

Europe has similar numbers.


Pleasanton Parent
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 18, 2021 at 11:41 pm
Pleasanton Parent, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 18, 2021 at 11:41 pm

Janet - be blessed, Im not against affordable housing in Pleasanton, I’m against rack and stack housing that breeds problems more so than solutions. You’re clearly set in your opinion with no openness to other inputs or thoughts. Good day.


Bay Area Native
Registered user
Pleasanton Valley
on Jun 19, 2021 at 1:07 pm
Bay Area Native, Pleasanton Valley
Registered user
on Jun 19, 2021 at 1:07 pm

Janet,

Please explain where the water and power will come from to support all of these high density homes. CA needs more housing units but FIRST we need the infrastructure. Major water projects (storage, desalination,recycling water, etc.) actual oversight of PG&E and SCE,new power generation/storage and repair of the existing grid. Sacramento has failed to do this yet you want to take away local control.


BobB
Registered user
Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jun 19, 2021 at 10:21 pm
BobB, Another Pleasanton neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 19, 2021 at 10:21 pm

"Please explain where the water and power will come from to support all of these high density homes."

There are easy and available solutions to both. Desalination and recycling completely solve the water problem for decades to come. All it takes is the will.

To PP,

Dublin is loaded with "Rack and Stack", and their crime rate is similar to Pleasanton. I'm personally glad to see many of the NIMBYs move out. Especially the racists (and the racists who say they aren't racist). Glad to see the culture changing. Out with the old in with the new. Thomas Jefferson was wrong, Alexander Hamilton was right.


Pleasanton Parent
Registered user
Pleasanton Meadows
on Jun 20, 2021 at 8:09 am
Pleasanton Parent, Pleasanton Meadows
Registered user
on Jun 20, 2021 at 8:09 am

Bob, crime rate is definitely a concern with increased population, but that’s not the only problem that high density housing creates. Please expand your openness to the concerns of others without resorting to calling them racists.


Bay Area Native
Registered user
Pleasanton Valley
on Jun 20, 2021 at 8:20 am
Bay Area Native, Pleasanton Valley
Registered user
on Jun 20, 2021 at 8:20 am

Bob,
I noted desalination and water recycling in my post. “All it takes is the will.” Our legislators clearly lack the will to fix our water and power issues which get worse every year. 50,000 homes without power yesterday in Alameda County. Third world problem not a first world problem.

Desalination requires construction of desalination facilities which also consume a lot of power. Rebuilding our power grid and constructing new power generation plants will take years. We do not have currently enough water or power to support high density housing.


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