News


Pleasanton school district enrollment declines

Recently released data aligns with projection

Compared with the 2011-12 school year, student enrollment has declined in Pleasanton Unified School District from 14,873 children then to 14,768 this school year, according to data recently released by the district.

Total enrollment did increase by 27 students this year compared with last year, with roughly 80 more students each at the middle and high levels. But there are 145 fewer children enrolled in the district's elementary schools this year compared with last, PUSD Senior Director of Student Services Kevin Johnson said during a presentation on enrollment at the Nov. 9 school board meeting.

The slight rise in middle school enrollment marked a continuing pattern of growth at that level, while a similar increase at the high school level comes after four years of decline, according to Johnson.

Looking at enrollment numbers on the first Monday in October over the last six school years, the district also found that the largest year-to-year increase in total student enrollment was 45.

"We have seen very consistent enrollment compared to most districts," Johnson said at the school board meeting.

Johnson also highlighted data that showed how student enrollment has changed by ethnicity over the last six years. The most notable changes were a nearly 11% rise in enrollment of Asian students, while enrollment of white students has dropped by 9% since 2011-12.

A demographer's report released in the spring stated that PUSD would see declining enrollment in the next decade due to falling birth rates and the elimination of the East Pleasanton Specific Plan from the unit forecast. The district is projected to have 13,977 students enrolled by fall 2025, according to that report.

Comments

7 people like this
Posted by Bridget
a resident of Birdland
on Nov 22, 2016 at 9:47 am

Interesting, not what I expected. That makes me hopeful but I'm still confused if forecast takes into account all the apartment complexes popping up. I also am curious how private school enrollment is doing.


10 people like this
Posted by Pete
a resident of Downtown
on Nov 22, 2016 at 10:19 am

Why did we vote on a school bond and why does it matter if the kids are white or Asian?


16 people like this
Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills
on Nov 22, 2016 at 10:54 am

Kathleen Ruegsegger is a registered user.

Mr. Johnson’s presentation can be found at Web Link It is item 14.4 on the agenda and a link to the PowerPoint is just above item 14.5.

There is a chart, “Comparison of Beginning to Year-end Growth,” that shows the October figure increases by the end of each school year.

2011-12 14,873 14,960 +87
12-13 14,918 14,930 +12
13-14 14,767 14,887 +120
14-15 14,747 14,778 +31
15-16 14,741 14,799 +58
16-17 14,768

As Bridget has noted, we have estimates, but not certainty about how enrollment will increase as new units come on line. While Mr. Johnson is correct that the demographer is within 1% on the estimates, one percent is nearly 150 students. One person I worked with used to say that students don’t arrive in bundles of 30 at one grade level, but the impact of 150 can open a tipping point where there is a need for a new teacher and classroom space at any one grade level.

There are other questions remaining when looking at the data. There are 74 elementary students overflowed out of their home schools due to lack of space, but there are 105 interdistrict elementary students that were accepted into the district. While this may not be a 1:1 relationship, we should be concerned about the causes of resident students not getting into their home schools, especially when we already have 64 portables/relocatables on those elementary sites. There are some 70 students district wide that have transferred out of the district to other districts/schools. Those are students who could come back to us.

Resident families pay their taxes, supported and will pay for the new $270 million bond, and should be the priority for a seat in their neighborhood school.

Pete, of the $270 million, only $35 million is slated for an elementary school. The rest is for a variety of things like technology, modernization, etc. The 64 portables at the elementary level is equivalent to two elementary schools. And while the demographer includes those portables as permanent housing, they still indicate we will need two additional elementary schools in 2025.


15 people like this
Posted by Ndna Jnz
a resident of Mohr Park
on Nov 22, 2016 at 10:56 am

I also do not see any value in reporting the increase in Asian student enrollment. If you're going to produce enrollment demographics, why single out Asians? Shouldn't all nationalities be included? I am white but, I find this somewhat insensitive.


6 people like this
Posted by hum?
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Nov 22, 2016 at 10:59 am

Coincidence this data was released after the bond was passed and the district got their money for a new school.

I guess we will have to see what all this new development brings us. Also want to know how much all this new development is paying for school impact fees. My guess is we will have the district say that the bond we passed is not enough money for a new school and we need matching funds from developers so we should build a lot more housing to get the extra development fees. That in turn bring in more students, meaning we need even more school facilities. Sigh.


5 people like this
Posted by Bi-Racial
a resident of Ruby Hill
on Nov 22, 2016 at 11:59 am

Our kids are bi-racial, how do they calculate 1/2 Asian & 1/2 white ?


Now expect more funds to squandered on administrators and frivolous programs like duel-immersion, mostly attended by non-hispanics families.


3 people like this
Posted by All About the Money
a resident of Del Prado
on Nov 22, 2016 at 2:43 pm

Given the data, why do we need another elementary or middle school? A small expansion at each school would be more economical than an entire new school. However, it isn't about the efficient deployment of capital, it is all about building a larger empire, hiring more administrative staff and more union employees. This is why the school board needs to get business expertise to provide input when making business decisions. They are about to blow $250mm and we will pay for it over the next 20 plus years. The folks making financial decisions are not trained in business and lack common sense in many areas. The main focus is a launching point for future political career. Watch how quickly that money gets spent. There will be no accountability.


3 people like this
Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills
on Nov 22, 2016 at 3:25 pm

Kathleen Ruegsegger is a registered user.

All about the money, the elementary sites were already expanded using portables. Unless you want schools with no outdoor space and enrollment of 1,000 students, there is no room for a "small expansion." There will be a citizens' oversight committee. It will take 30 years to pay the bonds, and that's once the last bond is issued. I don't think anyone likes adding to overhead costs; it's part of the reason no school, though badly needed, has been built.


3 people like this
Posted by AR15
a resident of Stoneridge
on Nov 23, 2016 at 9:43 am

AR15 is a registered user.

Glad I don't have kids in school, and my grandkids are out of state. I'm not PC. I am in favor of quality education, and more charter schools. I don't see the point of singling out ethnicity either.
I recently came across an online survey of live-ability for cities, and Ptown got 85%. A's except education B-, affordability F. With all this money being spent, regardless of facilities, we should rate higher in education.


7 people like this
Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills
on Nov 23, 2016 at 10:13 am

Kathleen Ruegsegger is a registered user.

The ethnic makeup of students is required by the state and thus is reported to the board. There's no conspiracy or racism. I believe parents can decline to state, and then there would be nothing to report.

I can find the link to the recent report on testing results if anyone is interested. We should be doing better, and while it is fine to celebrate the success of those performing at the top, it seemed overdone when looking at those who are struggling. Educators across the country cannot seem to address the gaps very well. Some of it is the socio-economic makeup of the community. The higher the level of education of the parents, the better students perform. There has to be a way we educate some parents on the value of the education their students receive, but there are many issues those families face. Single parents, some working multiple jobs, latch key kids, language barriers, lack of a connection to the school . . . I'm sure there are more.

Just suggesting we should participate more, be more gracious, and have higher expectations for those who govern, all the way up to the state including how schools are funded.


17 people like this
Posted by Zenmonkman
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Nov 23, 2016 at 12:09 pm

Zenmonkman is a registered user.

The dark underbelly of this story is the school districts ability to pay for its top heavy administrative infrastructure. If there are less students, at some point it's going to be hard to justify the heavy administrative load. CUT ADMINISTRATION.

For years students suffer because money travels to the top, not to the students. The quality of education has fallen since I first got here.


2 people like this
Posted by Bobbyboo
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Nov 23, 2016 at 2:12 pm

Bobbyboo is a registered user.

I don't understand this! Amador was over impacted this year.VERY FEW actually got in if they were out of catchment area. There is desperate need for a new High school especially as we have more new builds happening. As regard to Asian & whites they were just showing statistics. I do feel though that more whites are moving out of pleasanton as it's just so expensive now to live. I know of many friends that have moved away for that reason & they are white American.


Like this comment
Posted by BobB
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Nov 24, 2016 at 10:43 am

BobB is a registered user.

"With all this money being spent, regardless of facilities, we should rate higher in education."

Our schools do rate very high, based on test scores. We also spend relatively less than neighboring districts. For example, they (Dublin, San Ramon, ...) have parcel taxes, we don't.


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Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills
on Nov 24, 2016 at 4:12 pm

Kathleen Ruegsegger is a registered user.

Here are the results: Web Link

Item 14.1 PowerPoint (and a correction) follow the report (link above Item 14.2


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Posted by res1
a resident of Vineyard Hills
on Nov 25, 2016 at 6:47 pm

res1 is a registered user.

BobB, the parcel taxes are only a part of the equation of funding. If you look at the website ed-data (www.ed-data.k12.ca.us) you will see that Pleasanton currently receives more per student than San Ramon or Dublin, even after factoring in the parcel taxes of the other districts.

Going to ed-data.org you will see for 2014-15:
Pleasanton USD total revenue per student $9,056
Dublin $8,916
San Ramon: $8,889

If you take the number of students (14,330), we receive $2.4M more per year than San Ramon


Like this comment
Posted by SHale
a resident of San Ramon
on Nov 26, 2016 at 3:25 pm

SHale is a registered user.

res1: Well, not quite. SRVUSD has twice as many students and twice as many schools, tho non over capacity. With about $317m budget. Per student is lower than Pleasanton tho, but by only $200 per student. No way that translates to 2.4m more.


1 person likes this
Posted by Kathleen Ruegsegger
a resident of Vintage Hills
on Nov 26, 2016 at 6:20 pm

Kathleen Ruegsegger is a registered user.

Here is a link to Ed Data that compares Pleasanton with a few other districts: Web Link You can pick and choose. Ed Data has a lot of other data on districts, as does cde.ca.gov (look for link at bottom right side of the home page).


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Posted by res1
a resident of Vineyard Hills
on Nov 27, 2016 at 5:52 pm

res1 is a registered user.

SHale, what I was trying to say that at the enrollment on PUSD and the additional money PUSD receives per child, that adds up to $2.4M. I realize that comparing the total dollar amount is not a good comparison while the amount per student is. Was just trying to show how an extra $176/student adds up.


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Posted by SHale
a resident of San Ramon
on Nov 28, 2016 at 11:34 am

SHale is a registered user.

res1: I suppose if you change a really, really big variable between the 2 districts. Economy of scale is most likely the reason SRVUSD is less per student. With over double the amount of students and double the schools stands to reason they should be a savings someplace due to better ability to make 'deals'.
Now if Calif could just catch to most of the other states on per pupil spending....sheesh


Like this comment
Posted by res1
a resident of Vineyard Hills
on Nov 28, 2016 at 1:05 pm

res1 is a registered user.

The issue is that California has one of the highest tax rates but the percentage that goes to schools is near the middle compared to all the states. Hence the problem is the state is funding other items instead of schools. We only have our legislature to blame for trying to solve everybody's problem which results in not solving any problem well.


1 person likes this
Posted by SHale
a resident of San Ramon
on Nov 29, 2016 at 3:14 pm

SHale is a registered user.

The legislature we voted in, you mean?


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Posted by res1
a resident of Vineyard Hills
on Nov 29, 2016 at 4:34 pm

res1 is a registered user.

Yes, the legislature "we" voted in. Might not have been the representatives I voted for but it is what it is.


7 people like this
Posted by wilma
a resident of Alisal Elementary School
on Nov 30, 2016 at 6:01 pm

wilma is a registered user.

All very interesting and informative. THank you to those who are educated and willing to share. Side note, I dont see the problem in reporting on the ethnic or gender make up if there is a significant increase or decrease. It helps understand if additional monies are needed for language courses, for example. I have seen posts from Asian residents saying there needs to be local officials elected to represent their interests given their growing population. I have no problem there either. We are too PC sometimes and need to keep an open mind.


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Posted by res1
a resident of Vineyard Hills
on Dec 1, 2016 at 10:00 am

res1 is a registered user.

Wilma, anybody can run for public office, including Asian residents. In fact we have an Asian resident on the school board now I believe. People do not get appointed to public office based on their ethnicity. Residents run for office, explaining their thoughts, goals, etc., and then the local population votes.


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Posted by Wilma
a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Dec 2, 2016 at 9:53 am

Wilma is a registered user.

Res1, im not sure why you felt you had to respond that way, but yah, dud. I did vote for Hillary after all.


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Posted by res1
a resident of Vineyard Hills
on Dec 2, 2016 at 11:31 am

res1 is a registered user.

I responded that way based on your statement "I have seen posts from Asian residents saying there needs to be local officials elected to represent their interests given their growing population." I feel that if people complain because they feel they are not being represented, they should run for office themselves. Does not matter your race, gender, etc. It irks me when people complain that there is nobody running that represents them. If this is the case, they should do their civic duty and run for office.


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Posted by Wilma
a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Dec 2, 2016 at 6:07 pm

Wilma is a registered user.

Res1, great. I agree with you. Thought you were lecturing me.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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