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Amador Valley High diversity camp ends today with dance, music performance

Camp intended to foster cultural diversity

This year's Cheza Nami diversity camp will end its weeklong session into African art and music today with a student play at Amador Valley High School.

The camp, which aims to teach sixth through eighth graders about cultural diversity, engages kids with workshops African drumming, African dance, crafts, games and leadership discussions, according to the program website.

The play will be at noon today in the multipurpose room at Amador Valley High, 1155 Santa Rita Road. The public is invited to attend and to experience students' drum and dance routine.

The program is held annually and costs $250 per child, but scholarships are available for some children, according to the program's website. The camp is open to all children, not just students in the Pleasanton Unified School District.

Amador Valley teacher Heather Pereira said the camp was born when Cheza Nami foundation CEO Catherine Ndungu-Case proposed the collaboration after doing some diversity events at PUSD schools.

Pereira said kids really responded to Ndungu-Case's lessons and embraced the new culture they were learning about.

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Posted by Arthur Daniels
a resident of Stoneridge
on Jul 31, 2015 at 1:52 pm

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Posted by Alice
a resident of Horizon High School
on Jul 31, 2015 at 2:34 pm

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Posted by Arthur Daniels
a resident of Stoneridge
on Jul 31, 2015 at 3:04 pm

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Posted by FrequentWalkerMiles
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jul 31, 2015 at 3:17 pm

According to the website of Cheza Nami

"Our mission is to preserve and encourage the appreciation of African culture by inspiring and educating the American public about Africa’s extensive and unique attributes, regardless of their heritage of origin. Cheza Nami believes in a play-based, experiential approach to education and teaches African culture, through dance, play and movement. We use cultural activities such as dance, drumming, imaginative play and song to provide interactive, educational experiences. "

So why can't this generic sounding event be named to reflect its actual mission, which appears to focus on one continent? Surely people will be more informed if they knew what it is really all about, no?


Posted by Name hidden
a resident of Stoneridge

on Jul 31, 2015 at 7:03 pm

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Posted by Name hidden
a resident of Stoneridge

on Jul 31, 2015 at 7:11 pm

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Posted by Name hidden
a resident of Stoneridge

on Jul 31, 2015 at 7:13 pm

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