News

Fraser to retire as Pleasanton police chief

30 years on the job, including last 3 years as chief

Police Chief Michael Fraser will retire Nov. 12 as head of the Pleasanton Police Department after 30 years on the job, including the last three as chief.

Fraser is Pleasanton's fifth chief of police, appointed to the position in 2007 by City Manager Nelson Fialho and succeeding Chief Tim Neal, who retired that year. His annual salary currently is $200,000.

Fraser came up through the ranks, joining the Pleasanton police force in 1980 when it had 29 officers. Today, there are 84 officers on the force.

During the course of his career, he had a broad array of assignments including patrol officer, field training officer, detective sergeant and SWAT commander. He was also the fourth motorcycle officer in the Pleasanton police department's history.

Fraser introduced the E-911 service to Pleasanton in 2007. This service allows residents with cell phones to punch in 9-1-1 during an emergency and have the call go directly to the Pleasanton Police Department rather than a California Highway Patrol call center based in Vallejo. The change speeds up the local response time to an emergency by contacting Pleasanton police first during an emergency.

"Mike Fraser has been an exemplary chief of police," Fialho said. "His depth into the community cannot be understated. He really embraced community policing and played a major role in the quality of life that we enjoy in Pleasanton."

"Chief Fraser has evolved the police department to align with the needs of the population, and his forward thinking has led to the implementation of a new dispatch system that expedites incoming calls, and specialized training for our officers, particularly in the area of diversity," Fialho added.

When he first joined the Pleasanton police force as a patrol officer in 1980, Fraser found a Pleasanton that was in the middle of a major economic boom, largely associated with the development of Hacienda Business Park. Stoneridge Shopping Center was under construction and preparing to open in nine months with the original anchor stores of Macy's, Emporium Capwell, and JC Penney. The average family income was $30,000 and Pleasanton's population of just over 35,000 residents was experiencing rapid change.

"Pleasanton went from a small town bedroom community to a well balanced mid-sized city over the past 30-plus years that I have worked in here," Fraser said.

"There is a vast difference between the 'then' and 'now' aspect of my career," he added. "In 1980, the police department was housed in what is now the Museum On Main with a locker room, briefing room, report writing room, and lunch room. We kept track of all calls with paper and pencil. Everything was done manually."

Fraser has a bachelor's degree from the University of San Francisco and a Master's degree from Cal Poly University, Pomona. He graduated from Command College in 1996 and the FBI National Academy in 2001.

He has lived in Pleasanton for more than 27 years with his wife Diane. They have two daughters, Valerie and Stacie.

Fialho said recruitment for Fraser's successor will begin immediately with the final selection probably occurring in the March/April timeframe.

In the meantime, interim command will be provided by the department's two police captains, Eric Finn and Dave Spiller.

Comments

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Posted by Ted
a resident of Laguna Oaks
on Oct 28, 2010 at 10:12 pm

I am a litte confused about this statement:
"Fraser introduced the E-911 service to Pleasanton in 2007. This service allows residents with cell phones to punch in 9-1-1 during an emergency and have the call go directly to the Pleasanton Police Department rather than a California Highway Patrol call center based in Vallejo. The change speeds up the local response time to an emergency by contacting Pleasanton police first during an emergency. "

Can *anyone* point me to a story where this new E-911 service in Pleasanton was publicized by the Pleasanton Weekly?? The only mention I can find of the "e911" or "E-911" service was in an article dated 11/7/2007 regarding the very tragic crash on Foothill Road, where Officer Steve Creel of the CHP was quoted "He added that new technology is in the works, called e911, that would work as software on cell phones that would allow dispatchers to more easily identify through global position systems (GPS) where callers are calling from."

All this time, I had NO idea that calling 9-1-1 from withing the Pleasanton city limits would actually cause a call to go to the Pleasanton Police Emergency phone # instead of the CHP! And absolutely no one else I know, including the LPFD (Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department), from whom I am currently enrolled in a class and heard this information two weeks ago, does not seem to know this information...!



Like this comment
Posted by Ted
a resident of Laguna Oaks
on Oct 28, 2010 at 10:47 pm

Just an addendum to my post above: when I was going back through the archives to see that I hadn't missed an announcement by the Pleasantong Police Department regarding the "E-911" service referenced by the article, I saw this note by Police Chief Michael Fraser "I can be reached at (925) 931-5186 Monday through Thursday, typically from 9am until 5pm. ", in the PW Forum topic Web Link

Does this mean that Police Chief Fraser was being paid $200,000.00 a year to work Monday through Thursday 9am - 5pm? If I'm not reading this incorrectly, does this imply that he had Fridays off from work? And does this imply that he worked 8 hour days, where most of the other of us "working stiffs" work 8 1/2 - 9 hour days because we are required to take a mandatory 1/2 - 1 hour lunch break?

Please don't get me wrong; I truly respect and honor the public safety personnel and support high wages for their positions, but if they are working 4 days/week, at less than 8 hours a day, I wonder whether this report is correct?


Like this comment
Posted by GX
a resident of Foothill High School
on Oct 29, 2010 at 10:56 am

GX is a registered user.

The NPV of just his pension (not including medical) is somewhere between $4.5-5 MILLION assuming he lives as long as the general population. THIS IS NOT A SUSTAINABLE SITUATION!

Pleasanton pension costs are increasing dramatically and will only continue to do so because of actions like this. Retirement costs now eat up 9% of the budget and are growing at 10%/year as the overall budget remains flat or goes down.

In the meantime, city management and the City Council are trying to ignore this problem because it is politically difficult to address.

PLEASE WAKE UP AND SPEAK UP!!! Otherwise we will continued to be gamed and city services will continue to decrease.


Like this comment
Posted by DJohns
a resident of Amador Valley High School
on Oct 29, 2010 at 2:50 pm

DJohns is a registered user.

Three years in the position? He is a very young man, we will be paying his very high pension for a very long time. Even if he had been with Pleasanton for many years he should not have been put in a position just so he could retire with the highest pension.

It is irresponsible to hire top salary earners at the end of their careers. There should be a minimum commitment of years to receive such a high pension.

We are racking up retired top earners who we will be paying high pensions to for 20-30 years each.


Like this comment
Posted by GX
a resident of Foothill High School
on Oct 29, 2010 at 4:12 pm

GX is a registered user.

Assuming Mr. Fraser is 55 and he lives to 82 (Calper's estimate), Pleasanton is obligated to pay him $4.9 Million dollars - assuming he has not gamed the system and spiked his last year's compensation. This does not include the medical benefits he will receive.

And City management and the City Council is doing nothing about this hoping people won't notice or the problem will go away.

Keep this in mind as your taxes/fees go up and your services decrease.

Shame on Nelson and others for not dealing with this sooner. But of course they too will benefit from this unsustainable situation if people continue to ignore it.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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