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Daytime break-in at Pleasanton home nets more than $70,000 in jewelry

Original post made on Jan 18, 2013

Jewelry worth $72,000 was stolen in a Jan. 11 daytime burglary at a home in the 3400 block of Arbor Drive, according to police reports. Among the valuable jewelry taken were two sets of jewelry worth $15,000 apiece; white gold rings valued at $8,000; white gold earrings worth $8,000; and an antique white gold ring valued at $7,000.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Friday, January 18, 2013, 7:41 AM

Comments (10)

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Posted by Easy Pickins
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 18, 2013 at 11:17 am

How many people in Pleasanton are nuts? There are far too many occurrences of peoples houses being robbed these days, and its amazing how many of these robberies result in thefts of $50,000 - $100,000 or more in jewelry and gold. Folks that have jewelry and gold worth this much need to store it somewhere other than their house. These items are easily fenced and Pleasanton is getting a reputation as being easy pickings for big hauls, which endangers us all.


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Posted by Cholo
a resident of Livermore
on Jan 18, 2013 at 12:16 pm

oh...


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Posted by Sam
a resident of Oak Hill
on Jan 18, 2013 at 12:16 pm

Easy Pickens wrote: "How many people in Pleasanton are nuts? There are far too many occurrences of peoples houses being robbed these days, and its amazing how many of these robberies result in thefts of $50,000 - $100,000 or more in jewelry and gold."

I, too, am in disbelief that people would leave so much in valuable jewelry in their houses in places that would be accessible to a daytime burglary. If I had $70K in jewelry in my house, I would have it stashed away in secret locations where a burglar would never find it if he had all day to search my house. Can't draw any conclusions on this particular case of course, but I suspect that many of these cases must be an "inside job", possibly even insurance fraud. If so, then maybe the insurance companies themselves are to blame if they don't require very valuable insured jewelry to be securely locked away in a bank safe deposit box or other very secure location.


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Posted by Ralph Linder
a resident of Ruby Hill
on Jan 18, 2013 at 12:31 pm

Whenever we've been robbed, whether it's a bicycle in the garage or a couple cans of soup from the pantry, we get rid of all our domestic laborers - housekeepers, nanny, maids, and yard workers. It's almost always the help. Because of their low class status they have not cultivated a fine set of moral sensibilities. You can never trust them to do the right thing.


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Posted by William Tell
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 18, 2013 at 3:16 pm

(Post deemed inappropriate by Pleasanton Weekly Online staff)


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Posted by Cholo
a resident of Livermore
on Jan 18, 2013 at 3:48 pm

What's the FUSS? $70,000 in jewelry is not much...duh Was it mostly costume jewelry?


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Posted by Seen It All
a resident of Another Pleasanton neighborhood
on Jan 18, 2013 at 9:09 pm

I know that middle class people can own that much in jewelry because the average engagement ring is probably worth 10K and, if you've had a 10th or 25th anniversary, you might have a 15K 'tennis bracelt' and maybe your mother's wedding rings and bracelets valued at 15K. That's 40K right there. And there are two sets of parents and siblings, grandparents etc. who may have handed down some jewelry. And then, if you or your husband got a couple of bonuses or commissions, you might have some earrings. The point is that it is awful to hear people on this thread insinuate that people who have been robbed of items that have so much meaning to them (nevermind the monetary value) are somehow insurance frauds. When my husband was 10 years old, his house was burglarized and his mother's wedding rings were stolen. She had been widowed 2 years before. It was crushing. Not everything goes into a safe deposit box. Especially if you want to use it regularly.

Karma.


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Posted by Sam
a resident of Oak Hill
on Jan 18, 2013 at 10:28 pm

"Seen it All" wrote: "...And then, if you or your husband got a couple of bonuses or commissions, you might have some earrings. The point is that it is awful to hear people on this thread insinuate that people who have been robbed of items that have so much meaning to them (nevermind the monetary value) are somehow insurance frauds."

Well, I don't know whether this particular case was insurance fraud, but if not I still think that it was rather careless to leave $70K in personal goods in jewelry - a burglar's favorite target after cash - in a house in a place where the jewelry apparently wasn't hidden well enough for daytime burglars. Furthermore, news of a large successful burglary like this puts the surrounding community at more risk as well since burglars now have all the more reason to think that other houses in the neighborhood may also have large collections of expensive jewelry in them.


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Highland Oaks
on Jan 19, 2013 at 4:36 pm

If your possessions dictate your behavior, then you serve rather than enjoy them.


Mike


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Posted by Cholo
a resident of Livermore
on Jan 19, 2013 at 6:54 pm

i think it's an insurance scam...


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